Blog

Permaculture design course participants show their enthusiasm for coming together

Our Permaculture Community Comes Together 

Our 6-month Permaculture Design Courses run twice a year. This spring/summer, we are joined by Gail McNulty, a student in one of our courses. Gail is new to permaculture and after each of the 6 course weekends, she’ll be sharing a blog post about the weekend – what she learned, what inspired her, what connections […]

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Advanced Permaculture Design students celebrate earning their certificates

Take Permaculture to an Advanced Level

What do you do after the permaculture course? How do you dig deeper and take your designs to a professional and ultra-practical level? How can become more skillful in design implementation? Permaculture Design Courses are popular worldwide for the transformative experiences they provide and the introduction to a whole way of viewing landscapes and communities […]

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Permaculture course participants gardening in an organic garden.

Dirt Time

After six months of creating bonds with new people, transforming the way they think about ecosystems, communities, gardens, and relationships, and gathering hands-on experiences that broaden their skills and deepen their knowledge, our permaculture design students are eager to evaluate their new strengths and chart their next course. During our last weekend together we have […]

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Depiction of forest thinning for wildfire risk mitigation

Woodland Fire Risk Mitigation & Ecosystem Restoration

The content in this post was written by PINA & Siskiyou Permaculture on the PINA website . We found it so interesting, we wanted to share! It is reprinted with their permission. Fire Ecology Restoration Project PINA has received a $75,000 grant to research improved methods of wildfire risk mitigation in relation to forest health. […]

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Zone and Sector Analysis

One of the design methods used in permaculture that takes place early on in a site design is Zone and Sector Analysis. Through observation and gathering information about the site, its nearby surroundings, and the people who utilize or will utilize the site, we identify zones of use and sectors of energy that influence or affect the site. In this article we explore these two analyses.

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Rainwater Harvesting: Brush Check Dams and Gabions

In these articles, we’ve covered various ways to slow, sink, spread, and store rainwater. Gabions are another way to do this on landscapes that have eroded gullies or existing seasonal drainages. Creating brush gabions also puts to good use onsite fuel load you’ve reduced from your forest–all the branches, bushes, and small trees that are cleared to create defensible space and reduce fire fuel load in forested areas.

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