Courses

Permaculture Design Course

Two Courses Each Year:

April to September & October to March

Includes 110 hours of hands on activities, field trips and presentations

Enroll in the 6 month course, or choose specific weekends

  • Permaculture Design & Nature Awareness

  • Social Permaculture

  • Restoring Watersheds & Soils

  • Home Scale Permaculture: Creating Natural Homes and Edible Landscapes

  • Broad Scale Permaculture: Integrated Animal Husbandry and Forest Management

  • Community Development, Ecovillages, and Design for Mitigating Disaster

Echinacea

Introduction to Garden Herbalism

October 2018 – April 2019

Includes 33 hours of hands on activities, lecture & discussion

  • How to grow and harvest your own herbs for food & medicine

  • How to prepare effective remedies for cold, flu, immunity, fatigue, congestion, allergies, digestion, and vitality

  • Learn ethics and best practices for wildcrafting

  • Learn how to prepare herbal teas, salves, poultices, tinctures and aromatherapy

  • And more!

systems change

Systems Change & the Next Economy

Regenerative Design for People & the Planet

January – April 2019

  • Define Right Livelihood & reflect on one’s personal Right Livelihood

  • Further identify your vocare, or calling, and ways to move toward it

  • Apply the reflective process of the Spiral of the Work That Reconnects to one’s role in The Great Turning

  • Examine how permaculture design can support the development of regenerative economies

  • Explain the core function and purpose of “economics”

  • Illustrate the inextricable relationship between economics, ecology, and people

  • Explore various alternative economic systems, including Buddhist economics, gift economies, and doughnut economics

  • Gain a deeper understanding of the money and banking system in the U.S.

  • Examine how finance and investing can align with your values and support a local, resilient economy

  • Assess alternative economic tools and business models, including complementary currencies, timebanks, land trusts, and cooperatives

  • Challenge the assumptions and connotations of “economics” common in U.S. society